September 2015 Trivia and Insights

Restore the Oath of Allegiance Act: Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution gives Congress the power to establish a uniform rule of naturalization throughout the United States. Once Congress sets those laws in place the Executive Branch, specifically U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is tasked with carrying out those laws based on the power granted to them in Article II, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution. Q: According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approximately how many immigrants become naturalized citizens each year?
  • 500,270
  • 680,000
  • 720,300
Q: What is the number one barrier to becoming a U.S. Citizen for the 8.5 million immigrants who are eligible to do so?
  • The amount of time it takes to go through the process
  • The amount of money it takes to become a citizen
  • An issue with a language barrier
Debt Ceiling: Article I, Section 9 of the U.S. Constitution grants Congress the “power of the purse.” This means that Congress alone has the ability to tax and spend public money to pay for the national government and all that includes. Q: When spending bills are introduced they have to originate in a specific House, according to the U.S. Constitution.  Which House would this be?
  • The White House
  • The House of Representatives
  • The Senate
  Q: When was the last time this country was free of public debt?
  • 1836
  • 1916
  • 1993
Answers: Restore the Oath of Allegiance Act: Q: According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services approximately how many immigrants become naturalized citizens each year? A: Approximately 680,000 immigrants become naturalized citizens each year. It can vary from year to year, for instance, in 2014 654,949 people were naturalized and in 2013 777,416 people were naturalized. Q: What is the number one barrier to becoming a U.S. Citizen for the 8.5 million immigrants who are eligible to do so? A: The number one barrier to becoming a U.S. citizen is a language barrier. Although the $680 application fee is another commonly cited reason.   Debt Ceiling: Q: When spending bills are introduced they have to originate in a specific House, according to the U.S. Constitution.  Which House would this be? A: According to the U.S. Constitution spending bills have to originate in the House of Representatives and then go to the Senate for approval.   Q: When was the last time this country was free of public debt? A: There were three straight years of no public debt from 1834 through 1836.